NSTA Express
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Table of Contents

Looking for Grant Money This Summer?
Education Reform Group Publishes Its Take on Teacher Salaries
National Science Board Seeks Public Comment on Major Report
Reach for the Stars This Summer… Online with NTEN Astronomy Course
Fall Convention Workshops Can Help Grade 3–8 Teachers Stop Faking It!
No Banking Hours Here—Access NSTA Anytime Right From Your Computer!

Looking for Grant Money This Summer?

Then take a minute to check these informational grant resources that can assist with your search for funding for classroom projects, resources, or equipment: http://science.nsta.org/nstaexpress/nstaexpress_2003_06_23_extra.htm Thanks to the Public Education Network (http://www.publiceducation.org) for providing a number of these resources.

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Education Reform Group Publishes Its Take on Teacher Salaries

An article in the Spring 2003 issue of Education Next, an education reform journal published by the Hoover Institution, examines the NEA and AFT surveys of public school teacher salaries, along with statistics from the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, to argue that teachers are not underpaid.

Because of their shorter work year and workday, teachers actually earn more than many other professionals in the private sector, asserts author Michael Podgursky, chair of the Department of Economics at the University of Missouri–Columbia. He points out that public school teachers earn approximately $30 per hour when salary is computed on an hourly basis, compared to $22 per hour for private accountants and auditors, $24 per hour for private computer programmers, and $27 per hour for engineers and other professionals. The Education Next article can be found at http://www.educationnext.org/20033/71.html, or read a Salt Lake City Tribune article about the study at www.sltrib.com.

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National Science Board Seeks Public Comment on Major Report

The National Science Board (NSB), the governing body for the National Science Foundation, is seeking public comment on its Science and Engineering (S&E) Workforce Report. In the draft report, the NSB “finds it imperative that the federal government reassess its role and step forward with an aggressive effort to better prepare the nation’s S&E workforce starting with the earliest years of education.” The NSB recommendation on the pre-college teaching workforce for mathematics, science, and technology states, “In partnership with other stakeholders, the federal government should act now to attract and retain an adequate cadre of well-qualified pre-college teachers of mathematics, science, and technology.” Public comment will be accepted until July 1, 2003; go to www.nsf.gov/nsb.

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Reach for the Stars This Summer… Online with NTEN Astronomy Course

Looking for an online graduate-level Astronomy course this summer? Are you an elementary school science teacher? The National Teachers Enhancement Network (NTEN) is offering a one-credit course—NTEN Elementary–Space Science (PHYS 580-02). The course starts June 28, so go to http://www.scienceteacher.org/su03/phys58002.htm or call (800) 461-9635 for details and to register.

Course instructor Elizabeth Roettger notes, "I like the distance learning format because participants can say as much as they wish. Everyone participates in the discussions, not just the loudest or the fastest. I think participants learn from each other much more than they would even in a highly interactive face-to-face workshop. In this course, teachers learn astronomy by using the same activities that their students will use. Most of the activities can be exploited to gain a much deeper understanding than we'd expect of K–12 students. I love to see the discussions ranging from the science to the teaching methods and back again, sometimes without any discernable difference between the two."

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Fall Convention Workshops Can Help Grades 3–8 Teachers Stop Faking It!

Do you know what rubber bands and the Earth's tides have in common, what musical metal rods have to do with speeding tickets, why yellow and blue don't make green, and why gases don't expand when heated? Maybe you’re teaching grades 3–8 science without fully understanding it all—so it’s not as much fun as it could be. Bill Robertson, Ph.D. in science education, online teacher, K–12 science curriculum developer, and author of the popular NSTA Press® series Stop Faking It! Finally Understanding Science So You Can Teach It, will present a hands-on workshop at each of NSTA’s fall conventions: Minneapolis, Oct. 30–Nov. 1; Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 13–15; and Reno, Nevada, Dec. 4–6. Visit http://www.nsta.org/conventions for a look at the fall convention agendas and to register at earlybird prices. And like the books (visit http://store.nsta.org to browse them online), the workshops promise to be as entertaining as they are informative.

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No Banking Hours Here—Access NSTA Anytime Right From Your Computer!

NSTA is available to serve you 24/7. Simply visit www.nsta.org, where you can access an archive of journal articles http://www.nsta.org/journals from as far back as 1996 (members only) packed with teaching ideas and lesson plans; professional development courses http://institute.nsta.org; the SciLinks http://www.nsta.org/scilinks database of teacher approved websites (members only); the Science Store http://store.nsta.org; and much more.

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Hope you found this Monday’s edition of NSTA Express an interesting, quick read and a worthwhile update on the latest news and information from the National Science Teachers Association. Our goal is to save you time by delivering information each week in short "news bites," so if you'd like to know more, simply select the headline quick link. NSTA continues to create resources and improve services for science educators. If you're not already a member, we invite you to join the crowd by going to www.nsta.org/whyjoin

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