NSTA Express
 Main NSTA Website | Become an NSTA Member | Register for a Convention | NSTA Express Feedback | May 19, 2003



Table of Contents

NSTA Executive Director Testifies Before Congress
NSTA Journals Receive Top Honors
Biodegradation Subject of New NSTA Press® Decay and Renewal Book Set
While It's Not Quite "Having Your Name in Lights," It Could Be "Seeing Your Face on the Cover"
Study Shows Fewer High School Graduates Plan to Study Engineering

NSTA Executive Director Testifies Before Congress

On May 14, NSTA Executive Director Gerald Wheeler asked a U.S. House of Representatives appropriations subcommittee to increase its support for science and math education by funding the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Title II, Part B, Math and Science Partnerships at $200 million in fiscal year (FY) 2004. The program received $100 million in FY 2003.

The $100 million funding appropriated by this committee for FY 2003 allowed the partnerships to revert to a state-based competitive grant program, which means that state departments of education will soon be awarding grants to programs specifically targeted to science or math education (FY 2003 funds will be available this July). In his testimony, Wheeler said he believes much of the grant money will go toward content professional development for K–12 science and math teachers, an area that has fallen victim to budget cuts in many states.

Wheeler expressed appreciation for the FY 2003 funding, and he stressed the need for additional money to "allow the number of [Math and Science] partnerships to grow and provide programs to a greater number of schools, thereby increasing the scale and scope of science and math reforms that would help to increase teacher quality and lead to better student achievement."

Wheeler was invited to testify by Representative Ralph Regula (R-OH), chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies. A full transcript of the four-page testimony is available at www.nsta.org/main/pdfs/Wheeler20030514.pdf. For more information on the NCLB Math and Science Partnerships (and a chart explaining the funding available to your state), e-mail jpeterson@nsta.org.

(back)

NSTA Journals Receive Top Honors

NSTA is proud to announce that three of its teacher journals—Science and Children, The Science Teacher, and the Journal of College Science Teaching—received EXCEL awards from the Society of National Association Publications. The EXCEL awards recognize and reward the exemplary work of association publishers. The program judged more than 900 magazines, newsletters, scholarly journals, electronic publications, and websites in the areas of editorial, design, and general excellence this year. To read more about the awards, go to http://www.nsta.org/pressroom&news_story_ID=48294.

(back)

Biodegradation Is Subject of New NSTA Press® Decay and Renewal Book Set

Whether discarded substances break down or not, they affect our environment. By investigating the processes in wastewater treatment, composting, landfilling, and bioremediation of contaminated sites, Decay and Renewal, the newest book in the Cornell Environmental Inquiry Series from NSTA Press, teaches important science concepts within the context of environmental issues. Using inquiry-based methods, the book comes in two volumes for grades 9–12: the Teacher Edition, which features sample assessment tasks, rubrics for student research, poster presentations, written reports, and the complete Student Edition; and the Student Edition, for separate quantity purchase. To preview these important new books online and to order them, go to http://store.nsta.org/searchBasic.asp?searchTerm=Decay+and+Renewal.

(back)

While It's Not Quite "Having Your Name in Lights," It Could Be "Seeing Your Face on the Cover"

By now, NSTA members (as well as many others of you within the science education community) recognize the NSTA Recommends® Catalog by the ever-changing faces on its covers. And now the time has come to build a portfolio of new "faces from the classroom." Think you "look like a science teacher"?  Or maybe you've heard "but you don't look like a science teacher." And what, exactly, does a science teacher look like?

NSTA is seeking photos of science educators for possible future inclusion in our publications and marketing materials, such as our catalog, and we'd very much like to see you! To be included in our photo files, just send us a clear photoprint—studio portrait or good, clear 35mm shot—of yourself (low-tech, maybe, but still best for ease of reproduction), along with our "Talent Release Form," downloaded, filled out, and signed: Click on http://science.nsta.org/nstaexpress/nstaexpress_2003_05_19_extra.htm. Send to NSTA, Attn.: Marketing Dept., 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22201. If we choose to use your photo in the months to come, we won't identify you by name, only by your city and state and (optionally) grade or subject taught. 

(back)

Study Shows Fewer High School Graduates Plan to Study Engineering

A new study by the ACT shows a drop in the number of high school graduates who plan to study engineering in college, as well as lower levels of preparation and achievement among potential engineering students. Fewer than 6 percent of the 1.1 million seniors in the class of 2002 who took the ACT Assessment® college entrance and placement exam planned to study engineering in college, down from a high of nearly 9 percent in 1992. The study also reports that over the past 12 years the percentage of these students who have taken a college preparatory program in high school has decreased. The number of females and racial and ethnic minorities interested in the engineering field has also declined. The full report, titled Maintaining a Strong Engineering Workforce, can be found at http://www.act.org/research/policy/pdf/engineer.pdf.

(back)


Not a member and want to join? Visit https://ecommerce.nsta.org/membership/apply.asp!

NSTA Express Feedback
Please take a moment and use this form to submit suggestions for NSTA Express to the NSTA Express team:


If you would rather use email to send suggestions, please send them here: nstaexpress@nsta.org

Hope you found this Monday’s edition of NSTA Express an interesting, quick read and a worthwhile update on the latest news and information from the National Science Teachers Association. Our goal is to save you time by delivering information each week in short "news bites," so if you'd like to know more, simply select the headline quick link. NSTA continues to create resources and improve services for science educators. If you're not already a member, we invite you to join the crowd by going to www.nsta.org/whyjoin

(back)


THE FINE PRINT
This e-newsletter is brought to you by the National Science Teachers Association
1840 Wilson Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201-3000
Phone: (703) 243-7100
http://www.nsta.org

If you want to receive NSTA Express by e-mail, please follow this link: http://www.nsta.org/newsletters
If you do not want to receive NSTA Express by e-mail, please follow this link: http://ecommerce.nsta.org/optout?email=<#EMAIL#>&source=nstaexpress