Articles from the Science Scope Archives: Classroom Management

Classroom Management: Setting Up the Classroom for Learning
Summer 2009
Student learning is directly related to classroom control established the first week of school (Wong and Wong 2001)—what you do the first day counts, and what you do the first 10 minutes counts even more. This article shares the advanced planning aspects of classroom management that should be in place before students enter the classroom for the first time: the physical environment; routines, policies, and procedures; materials management; as well as a review process to extend what students learn.

Science Sampler: Classroom management, rules, consequences, and rewards! Oh, my!
Summer 2009
Teachers must start with an organized classroom. Think through how you want your classroom arranged, how students will turn in work, and where supplies are located. Students should also be instructed how the classroom is set up and who should be retrieving supplies. Having numbered containers with supplies is a quick way to distribute materials and check that everything has been returned at the end of the period. This article outlines additional classroom management plans that will prepare new teachers for the first day of school and throughout the entire school year.

Classroom Management and Inquiry-Based Learning: Finding the Balance
Summer 2009
Inquiry practices often involve more student-centered activities where students interact more intensively with materials and with other students during investigations. In addition to monitoring the learning taking place, teachers in an inquiry classroom have to manage more movements of materials and equipment and the social dynamics among students. In this article, the authors share seven successful strategies one teacher used in managing a grade 6 class that gave her confidence in transitioning from a traditional classroom to a more inquiry-based classroom.

Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms
Summer 2009
Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination you’ll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. Any experienced middle school science teacher can tell you that successful classroom management is an ongoing, evolving process—teachers need to modify their daily practices based on the observed behaviors and feedback of their students. This article describes some strategies to manage inquiry-based science classrooms effectively.